JSON Configuration in ASP.NET Core MVC

Structured data in earlier versions of ASP.NET meant creating and registering custom types and configuration sections for our applications. In ASP.NET Core and in Core MVC, structured configuration is a breeze with support for JSON documents as the storage mechanism and the ability to flatten hierarchies into highly portable keys.

Structured JSON Configuration

ASP.net vNext is now ASP.net 5 is now ASP.net Core 1.0

Did you hear the news? ASP.NET 5 is dead it is now called ASP.NET Core 1.0. The name for this next generation of ASP.net(that’s the capitalization I’m using because this isn’t your grandmother typing in YAHOO.COM) has been up in the air for a while. We first heard the real details about ASP.net vNext at the MVP summit in 2014 and the first question on everybody’s mind was “what it was going to be called?”. At the time there wasn’t a decision on that.

Configuration in ASP.NET Core MVC

Config in Startup.cs

ASP.NET Core MVC introduces a new configuration system that adds flexibility and simultaneously enables cross-platform support (in a way that makes sense on other platforms). In this post we’re going to cover the basics of configuration and what you can expect as you look at the project template from File -> New Project in Visual Studio 2015.

Grrr, Rowr - The Monsters are Here

The ASP.NET Monsters are here to explain everything they know about ASP.NET Core and the new version of the MVC Framework, known as ASP.NET Core MVC. Once or so per week Dave, James and Simon publish a new, short video about some aspect of ASP.net in their own, monstrous, style.

Watch the Videos

Our latest videos are available on the youtube and we try to publish a new one every Monday.

Our earlier monsterific videos are hosted on Channel 9, and you can view the entire list here, or start watching from the beginning below.

Meet The Monsters.

Goodbye Child Actions, Hello View Components

In previous versions of MVC, we used Child Actions to build reusable components. Child Actions do not exist in MVC 6. Instead, we are encouraged to use the new View Component feature to support this use case.

Special Guests on The Monsters

Guests from the ASP.NET Community

Without a diverse set of folks working in the web space, I think we could all agree that web development would be a lot less interesting. We are fortunate to have some of the community’s best and brightest thinkers join us to chat here on the Monsters.


Jon Galloway
Episode 79: ASP.NET Core Code Labs Nov 17, 2016


Christopher Anderson
Episode 78: Azure Functions Nov 15, 2016


Darrel Miller
Episode 61: Building APIs Aug 25, 2016


Taylor Mullen
Episode 59: The Razor View Engine Aug 18, 2016


Jeffery Palermo
Episode 55: Moving the Business to ASP.NET Core Aug 4, 2016


Eric Flemming
Episode 53: Basics of Web API July 28, 2016


Julie Lerman
Episode 47: The State of EF Core July 8, 2016


Mads Kristensen
Episode 43: Hello Bundler Minifier June 23, 2016


Maixime Rouiller
Episode 42: Goodbye to Gulp June 21, 2016


Complex Custom Tag Helpers in MVC 6

In a previous blog post we talked about how to create a simple tag helper in MVC 6. In today’s post we take this one step further and create a more complex tag helper that is made up of multiple parts.

ApiController in ASP.NET 5? Nopesauce.

If you’re developing in ASP.NET Web API you are familiar with the concept of inheriting from the base ApiController class. This class is still around in ASP.NET 5, but it is likely not meant for you to use.  Here’s why your cheese has moved.

Supporting Options and Arguments in Your dnx Commands

Grab yourself your copy of Visual Studio 2015 and buckle up! Today we’re going to create our own dnx command with support for options and arguments.

Writing Custom Commands for DNX with ASP.NET 5.0

If you are a developer on the .NET stack, you’ve now got access to a great new extension to your development environment. DNX, or the .NET Execution Environment, is a powerful new extensibility point that you can leverage to build project extensions, cross-platform utilities, build-time extensions and support for automation. In this article I’ll walk you through the process of building your own custom DNX command on top of ASP.NET 5.0.